LSU fans smell like corndogs.

Jul 20, 2006
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LSU fans smell just like corn dogs.

Yes, it is often said, but so, so true.

LSU fans do smell like corn dogs.

I would never tell them that to their face though. This is something better said at internet distances. Even now, I am afraid.

I am afraid that they'll know I said it. I'll walk past an LSU fan someday, and he'll see that look in my eye that gives it away. That look that says, "gee, what is that smell? Is it corn dogs?" The next thing you know, I'll have flat tires on my car.

If you only learn one thing from me today, remember not to tell LSU fans how they smell - you know, like corn dogs.

LSU fans seem, somehow, sensitive to that whole corn dog issue.


I think this may be why a lot of fans get beaten up by LSU fans. If you attend a game in Baton Rouge, try to avoid telling them that they smell like corn dogs. Say something else instead. Like, "Wow, LSU sure does have a great team this year. This is going to be a great SEC game."

It's hard. I know. It's like when you're having sex and you try to think about baseball. That corn dog smell is just so overwhelming. It makes it hard for you to think about football or baseball or whatever else. Your brain wanders into corn dog topics like: "Gee, I wonder if I took a bite of your finger, if you would taste just like a corn dog?"; or "Is this a real person or is it a giant corn dog trying to make me think it is a real person?" or "What did that giant corn dog just say?" or "Excuse me, Mister, why is it that you smell just exactly like corn dogs smell?" or, of course, after a silencer: "Madam, did you just let the corn dogs out?"

Heck, after what I've heard about LSU fans, I think it may be better not to smell them at all. Okay, not all of them. Some of them are nice. Sure. Smell the nice ones. That's okay.

You know what else is a bad thing to do? Holding your nose around them. They are real sensitive to that, too. Try holding your breath. But don't be obvious about it. Somehow they know you're trying not to breathe in the corn dog smell. And that offends them. They'll likely punch you for that if they catch on to what you're doing.

If you do breathe it in long enough, though, it'll permeate your whole body, and then you'll smell like a corn dog just like they do. But don't say, "Dang, now I smell like a corn dog." They take offense to that. And they will throw things. But not corn dogs. Hard stuff. Stuff that leaves bruises and makes you bleed. Then you may have to get stitches or something. Just don't say it. If you do start smelling like a corn dog, just shut up about it. Okay?

I think kids are acutely aware of corn dog smells too. Counsel your kids on how to behave around LSU fans. If LSU fans are driving around town, do not let your kids stick their heads out of your car window and sniff the air. No. Keep your windows rolled up. An odd change in their expression - indicating they smell corn dogs - might get a wrench or pipe or some other object tossed at your windshield. So, that's dangerous. Let your kids stick their heads out of the car windows as you drive - on some other weekend

I know you are just as puzzled as I am about some of this corn dog stuff. What puzzles me most is that I've never actually seen any of these LSU fans with a corn dog in their hand. Okay, maybe there's no mystery there - maybe they already ate the corn dogs. Who knows?

Maybe there's a corn dog factory in Baton Rouge and they all work there. Maybe, there's a corn dog lotion that they wear, or a French perfume. Maybe their city council puts corn dog juice in the water supply - kind of like fluoride. The politics there are probably weird. The big political issue during the city election is whether they should add more ketchup or more mustard to the water. Don't comment on it though. It's not politically correct over there. It's like a malnutrition issue or something. It's like the corn dogs are probably added to the water to prevent starvation or something.

I know when you go to Baton Rouge, you're thinking: "Ahhhh. Here I am in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. I'll bet the people here smell just like boiled crawfish or shrimp etoufee' or some fancy Cajun food." But just stop thinking that. That's just a myth. They smell just like corn dogs.

In fact, please listen to my advice. Leave them alone about the corn dog odor. And don't try masking the odor with something stronger. They'll curse at you. They'll say something like: "WTF, how dare you smoke a cigar in my home," or "WTF!! Are you too good for the smell of corn dogs?" and they'll cuss out your kids too: "WTF!!! Little Mister fancy pants over here acts like he doesn't want to smell like corn dogs."

Cajuns are not like us. Don't you see that, yet? They are really sensitive about being sniffed and about their corn dog aroma. They know they smell like corn dogs and it is no laughing matter to them at all. I know, I know. We sniff the bammers and the UGA dawgs and the Ole messes, and we keep a straight face with each of them, but don't press your luck with the Cajun tiger fans. Don't refer to Death Valley as corn dog valley either. I mean that's just wrong. Even if you've been drinking, they'll beat you up and curse out your kids.

Along these lines, be extra careful when you laugh in their direction - even if you're laughing about something else. Like baseball or football, or sex or whatever. If you can't control yourself and you must laugh though, do not snort. The snorting makes them think that you smell their corn dog body odor from a distance or that you're choking on it or something. They'll likely burn your van for that. We lost a campus building over just one snort.

So, just remember. You can love one another without sniffing each other. You can enjoy the clash of a couple of good football teams. You can enjoy the thrill of the rivalry. But after the game, please heed my words. Please just move along. No sniffing the opposing fans this Saturday. Okay? Get your corn dog jollies at home.

Enough with this corn dog talk. Let's play ball...
 

Reasoned

All Conference
Oct 25, 2017
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Wow…, that sounds appetizing, corn dogs and cheap beer on a hot Baton Rouge day. 🤢
 
Jul 20, 2006
2,493
2,508
113
Wow…, that sounds appetizing, corn dogs and cheap beer on a hot Baton Rouge day. 🤢
The Cajuns cook up a storm! They will have everything from etouffèe to deep fried alligator tail. Their food is awesome. It’s them, not their food, that stinks like corndogs. It’s weird but if you have a dog, smell his paws. THAT is what they smell like.
 

Pops Masterson

All Conference
Jan 8, 2004
4,492
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The Cajuns cook up a storm! They will have everything from etouffèe to deep fried alligator tail. Their food is awesome. It’s them, not their food, that stinks like corndogs. It’s weird but if you have a dog, smell his paws. THAT is what they smell like.
There’s an LSU poster on the mb you may have seen, lsumark, who sent me a gumbo recipe, and it’s the best I’ve ever had.
 

Pops Masterson

All Conference
Jan 8, 2004
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Need to try that now that’s it’s cooling off. Got a link?
What’s the roux?
  • 3lbs chicken thighs (or 50/50 breast and thigh) skinless, deboned
  • 2lbs smoked sausage - cut in 1"
  • 3 quarts chicken stock
  • 1 cup veg oil
  • 1 cup flour
  • 2 -3 med white onions, diced
  • 1 green bell pepper, diced
  • 1 red bell pepper, diced
  • 1 clove garlic, diced fine
  • 2 bunch green onions
  • 1 bunch parsley
  • salt and pepper and cajun seasoning
  • hot sauce

In a cast iron dutch oven, heat some oil over medium-high heat. Season chicken (I use Slap Ya Momma) and brown the chicken. You will need to do in batches.

Sear off the sausage. You want to cook it till the fat renders out. Remove sausage.

Add the veggie oil (depending on how much oil released from sausage, about a cup).
Do this over a med heat to med-low heat.
Sprinkle in flour. (use a wire whisk - I find it will even out the flour better). Stir constantly until roux darkens to a caramel color. Do not allow roux to scorch - keep stirring. A good deep roux will take 40-60 mins. Did I mention to keep stirring - keep stirring.

When roux is color you want, add onions, bell pepper and garlic.
Sauté until vegetables are wilted add some salt, pepper and cajun seasoning.
Some folks wilt the vegs first then make the roux once they are wilted down. You can do that, but I can't get a good roux doing it that way.

Add chicken and sausage back. Let them meld with veggies and roux for a couple mins.

Slowly add stock, one ladle at a time, stirring constantly until all is incorporated. Warm your stock - don't add cold stock to hot roux - it will never mix.

Bring to a low boil for about 5-10 mins. Then reduce to simmer and cook approximately 60 minutes at the least. I let mine simmer 2-3 hours at a minimum. You will lose some liquid, so just add more stock as you keep cooking.

Add green onions and parsley. Taste it here - may need to season and add hot sauce here (I do 6-8 shakes).

Serve over rice.
 

GwinnettDawg

All Conference
Aug 7, 2001
3,360
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  • 3lbs chicken thighs (or 50/50 breast and thigh) skinless, deboned
  • 2lbs smoked sausage - cut in 1"
  • 3 quarts chicken stock
  • 1 cup veg oil
  • 1 cup flour
  • 2 -3 med white onions, diced
  • 1 green bell pepper, diced
  • 1 red bell pepper, diced
  • 1 clove garlic, diced fine
  • 2 bunch green onions
  • 1 bunch parsley
  • salt and pepper and cajun seasoning
  • hot sauce

In a cast iron dutch oven, heat some oil over medium-high heat. Season chicken (I use Slap Ya Momma) and brown the chicken. You will need to do in batches.

Sear off the sausage. You want to cook it till the fat renders out. Remove sausage.

Add the veggie oil (depending on how much oil released from sausage, about a cup).
Do this over a med heat to med-low heat.
Sprinkle in flour. (use a wire whisk - I find it will even out the flour better). Stir constantly until roux darkens to a caramel color. Do not allow roux to scorch - keep stirring. A good deep roux will take 40-60 mins. Did I mention to keep stirring - keep stirring.

When roux is color you want, add onions, bell pepper and garlic.
Sauté until vegetables are wilted add some salt, pepper and cajun seasoning.
Some folks wilt the vegs first then make the roux once they are wilted down. You can do that, but I can't get a good roux doing it that way.

Add chicken and sausage back. Let them meld with veggies and roux for a couple mins.

Slowly add stock, one ladle at a time, stirring constantly until all is incorporated. Warm your stock - don't add cold stock to hot roux - it will never mix.

Bring to a low boil for about 5-10 mins. Then reduce to simmer and cook approximately 60 minutes at the least. I let mine simmer 2-3 hours at a minimum. You will lose some liquid, so just add more stock as you keep cooking.

Add green onions and parsley. Taste it here - may need to season and add hot sauce here (I do 6-8 shakes).

Serve over rice.
That’s a shitload of food
 
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hokiemokie

Freshman
Dec 31, 2009
740
1,241
93
  • 3lbs chicken thighs (or 50/50 breast and thigh) skinless, deboned
  • 2lbs smoked sausage - cut in 1"
  • 3 quarts chicken stock
  • 1 cup veg oil
  • 1 cup flour
  • 2 -3 med white onions, diced
  • 1 green bell pepper, diced
  • 1 red bell pepper, diced
  • 1 clove garlic, diced fine
  • 2 bunch green onions
  • 1 bunch parsley
  • salt and pepper and cajun seasoning
  • hot sauce

In a cast iron dutch oven, heat some oil over medium-high heat. Season chicken (I use Slap Ya Momma) and brown the chicken. You will need to do in batches.

Sear off the sausage. You want to cook it till the fat renders out. Remove sausage.

Add the veggie oil (depending on how much oil released from sausage, about a cup).
Do this over a med heat to med-low heat.
Sprinkle in flour. (use a wire whisk - I find it will even out the flour better). Stir constantly until roux darkens to a caramel color. Do not allow roux to scorch - keep stirring. A good deep roux will take 40-60 mins. Did I mention to keep stirring - keep stirring.

When roux is color you want, add onions, bell pepper and garlic.
Sauté until vegetables are wilted add some salt, pepper and cajun seasoning.
Some folks wilt the vegs first then make the roux once they are wilted down. You can do that, but I can't get a good roux doing it that way.

Add chicken and sausage back. Let them meld with veggies and roux for a couple mins.

Slowly add stock, one ladle at a time, stirring constantly until all is incorporated. Warm your stock - don't add cold stock to hot roux - it will never mix.

Bring to a low boil for about 5-10 mins. Then reduce to simmer and cook approximately 60 minutes at the least. I let mine simmer 2-3 hours at a minimum. You will lose some liquid, so just add more stock as you keep cooking.

Add green onions and parsley. Taste it here - may need to season and add hot sauce here (I do 6-8 shakes).

Serve over rice.
One speck of black scorch in the roux and you will have to start over or you will ruin the whole pot if you continue .
 

Pops Masterson

All Conference
Jan 8, 2004
4,492
8,857
113
I make pretty good Brunswick stew and it takes me a week or so to eat it all if it's just me. Calls for 7-8 lb Boston Butt but I usually go with 5 or so. Set some aside for smmiches and the rest goes in.
Are you going to send me some or what?


That’ll make the cardiologist smile.
As has been well noted, I am an apex predator which allows me to eat most anything I please.
 

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